Higher Ed Press Clips June 2012

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30

June 1, 2012

The Trinidad Times:

Wall Street Journal:

June 2-4, 2012

Denver Post:

Ed News:

Durango Herald:

KKCO – Channel 11 (Grand Junction) :

USA Today:

NY Times:

June 5, 2012

Denver Post:

Ed News:

Durango Herald:

Washington Post:

Wall Street Journal:

NY Times:

June 6, 2012

Denver Post:

9 News:

Durango Herald:

Boulder Daily Camera:

Inside Higher Ed:

NY Times:

June 7-11, 2012

Denver Post:

Pueblo Chieftain:

Ed News:

 

June 12, 2012

Denver Post:

Ed News:

La Junta Tribune Democrat:

Media Matters:

Ed Week:

June 13, 2012

Denver Post:

Boulder Daily Camera:

Ed News:

Inside Higher Ed:

June 14, 2012

Denver Post:

Ed News:

Boulder Daily Camera:

June 15, 2012

Wall Street Journal:

Inside Higher Ed:

June 16-19, 2012

Denver Post:
Colorado State University football stadium idea divides Fort Collins –
Jack Graham has a vision of Saturdays in Fort Collins, game-day afternoons full of pomp and circumstance and tradition. And winning football. Lots and lots of winning.
But nowhere in his flights of fancy is there room for Hughes Stadium, which, in the mind of the Colorado State University's new athletic director, is part of a bigger problem that desperately needs fixing.  "I took this job because I was so frustrated with the way athletics was performing. Not just because we were losing, but the bigger issue was that we were an anchor on the reputation of this university," Graham said. "I was tired of it. I expressed my frustration, and I asked myself, 'What has to happen here to change that dynamic.' "
http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20875102/colorado-state-university-football-stadium

Denver-based firm is helping college-bound students plan their careers –
College is a great place for students to learn what they want to do for the rest of their lives — true or false? "It's a prevalent mind-set in this country that you go to college to figure out what you want to do. That's an expensive way to do it, and it's not very effective," says Rabbi Levi Brackman, an educator and co-founder of Youth Directions.   Some of the most important decisions in life are made between the ages of 15 and 22, yet most students are ill-equipped to make them, said Brackman, author of "Jewish Wisdom for Business Success." A little self-discovery beforehand, he said, is a very good investment.  Brackman established the nonprofit Youth Directions in 2009 to provide students with in-depth and strategic coaching on prospective vocations. It has helped more than 300 students find their callings, he said.
http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20886626/directing-ambition

Ed News:
Monday Churn: Looking for cash –
It’s that time again. If you’re at all active in education policy, politics or civic affairs in general, you’re probably on somebody’s list for political contributions. For instance, circulating recently was an email from the Democrats for Education Reform Small Donor Committee, inviting potential donors to a Tuesday event with Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia as the featured guest.
http://www.ednewscolorado.org/2012/06/18/39157-monday-churn-looking-for-cash

What do test scores predict? –
Lots of people from legislators to students like to dismiss the value of Colorado’s annual high school exams, but a new report suggests the test results may be useful as an indicator of who’s more likely to stay in college.  The report found that scores on the 10th-grade math CSAP tests were almost as good an indicator that a student will continue in college as student ratings on the admissions index that colleges use when considering applications.  The higher a student’s CSAP result, the more likely the student will complete at least 30 credit hours of college work – roughly a year of higher education.
http://www.ednewscolorado.org/2012/06/18/39194-what-do-test-scores-predict

Durango Herald:
(Opinion – Dene Thomas) Old Fort Lewis offers little help with tuition waiver –
I have heard a great deal of interest from Fort Lewis College students, alumni and members of our community in the future of the land that is the birthplace of Fort Lewis College, known as Old Fort Lewis at Hesperus.  There is also interest in the future of the Native American Tuition Waiver program. As the impact of these two subjects stretches beyond the borders of campus, I would like to present the latest developments for both the Old Fort and the tuition waiver. First, the Old Fort Lewis land. In response to some concerns, FLC has worked with the Colorado State Land Board and the Colorado Attorney General’s Office this year to investigate the history and usage of the Old Fort Lewis property. As a result, a document entitled “The Old Fort Lewis at Hesperus FAQ” was written that gives an accurate overview of the administration and history of the land.
http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20120617/OPINION02/706179955/-1/Opinion

Ed Week:
Blog: Student Spending at Public Universities Found to Be Eroding –
The bulk of new enrollment in higher education over the past decade has been at public institutions, where increases in money spent on students has been smaller than increases in tuition and fees. Trends in Public Higher Education: Enrollment, Prices, Student Aid, Revenues, and Expenditures just released by the College Board notes that in the fall of 2009, three-quarters of all undergraduate students and 70 percent of full-time undergraduates were enrolled in public two-year and four-year institutions. There has been an influx of about 5 million students since 2000, bringing the total postsecondary enrollment up by 25 percent to 20.4 million.
On average, published in-state prices at four-year public universities over the past decade increased at an annual rate of 5.6 percent beyond general inflation and 3.8 percent beyond inflation at public two-year schools.
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/college_bound/2012/06/_trends_in_public_higher.html

Inside Higher Ed:
Complete College America declares war on remediation –
Complete College America is on a crusade to improve remedial education, which it says is hopelessly broken and failing students. The group has had big successes in a campaign that is gathering steam, but some community college leaders say its rhetoric and proposed fixes go too far.  That dissent is usually voiced privately. The two-year-old Complete College America is a savvy political operator, having persuaded lawmakers in 30 states to sign on to its completion goals. And the group receives support, both fiscal and, sometimes, on policy, from both the Lumina and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundations.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/19/complete-college-america-declares-war-remediation

June 20, 2012

Denver Post:
Colorado AG says no to Metro’s tuition rate for undocumented students –
Colorado Attorney General John Suthers on Tuesday said state-supported institutions of higher education do not have the authority to create discounted tuition categories for illegal-immigrant students without legislative approval.   The opinion came in response to a query from the Colorado Community College System after Metropolitan State College of Denver's decision earlier this month to create a new tuition rate for such students.   Suthers said Metro's new rate creates a "public benefit." Under state law, public benefits can be given only to individuals who can prove their lawful presence in the United States.
http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20893150/attorney-general-metro-states-illegal-immigrant-tuition-plan

Boulder Daily Camera:
(Associated Press) Colorado AG: Metro State’s new tuition rate for undocumented students is unlawful –
The Metropolitan State College of Denver does not have legal authority to create a discounted tuition category for illegal immigrants, Colorado Attorney General John Suthers said in an opinion released Tuesday.   Suthers said that under federal law, the Legislature must decide whether to create a new tuition rate for illegal immigrants and that Metro State's decision "is simply not supported by governing law."  "The General Assembly may continue to consider this issue," said Suthers, a Republican. "In the meantime, however, state-supported institutions of higher education in Colorado cannot act unilaterally."  University of Colorado Regent Joe Neguse previously had told the Daily Camera that he was considering asking the CU board to approve a similar rate for undocumented students.
http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_20892785/colorado-ag-metro-states-new-tuition-rate-undocumented

Denver Business Journal:
AG Suthers: Colorado colleges can’t give illegal immigrants a discount –
Colorado's state-supported colleges can't give illegal immigrant students a discount on tuition under current law, Attorney General John Suthers said in a formal opinion Tuesday.  The opinion comes after Metropolitan State College of Denver’s trustees voted 7-1 on June 7 to lower tuition rates for the 2012-13 school year for illegal-immigrant students from Colorado.  Trustees set a tuition level lower than the out-of-state rate that undocumented students would have paid otherwise, but higher than in-state tuition.  Suthers' opinion is legally non-binding, but may play a role in any future challenges to Metro State's action. For example, it's likely the opinion means that Suthers' office won't defend Metro State against any lawsuits challenging its tuition action.
http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/news/2012/06/19/ag-suthers-colorado-colleges-cant.html

Ed News:
AG: Undocumented tuition rate illegal –
Colorado Attorney General John Suthers on Tuesday issued an opinion declaring the special tuition rate for undocumented students created this month by Metro State University is illegal.  Suthers said in a news release that he issued the formal opinion in response to “a question posed by the Colorado Community College System.”  “After carefully reviewing the state and federal law in this area, my office has concluded that Colorado’s state-supported higher-education institutions cannot create discounted tuition categories for students who are unable to prove their lawful presence in the United States,” Suthers wrote.  “Although federal law allows state legislatures to pass statutes affirmatively providing tuition benefits to undocumented students, the General Assembly has repeatedly declined to legislate in this area.”
http://www.ednewscolorado.org/2012/06/19/39260-ag-undocumented-tuition-rate-illegal

Durango Herald:
(Associated Press) AG takes issue with immigrant tuition rate –
The Metropolitan State College of Denver does not have legal authority to create a discounted tuition category for illegal immigrants, Colorado Attorney General John Suthers said in an opinion released Tuesday.  Suthers said according federal law, the Legislature must decide whether to create a new tuition rate for illegal immigrants because it is a “public benefit,” which cannot be given to illegal immigrants under state and federal laws. He said Metro State’s decision “is simply not supported by governing law.”
http://www.durangoherald.com/article/20120620/NEWS02/706209920/AG-takes-issue-with-immigrant-tuition-rate-

Inside Higher Ed:
Business group ranks states on effectiveness of public colleges –
Public colleges must do a better job of measuring their efficiency and quality, said an affiliate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which on Tuesday released a report that ranks states on the “bang for the buck” of their public higher education systems.  Several worrisome trends spurred the Institute for a Competitive Workforce, a group led by Margaret Spellings, a secretary of education in the George W. Bush Administration, to conduct the research behind the report, including college completion shortfalls, increasing tuition rates and concern about the rigor of a college education.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/20/business-group-ranks-states-effectiveness-public-colleges

June 21, 2012

Denver Post:
Metro State holds ground with JBC over new immigrant tuition rate –
Over the course of an intense, sometimes testy hour, officials from Metropolitan State College of Denver met on Wednesday with members of the state legislature's Joint Budget Committee to discuss its controversial new tuition rate for illegal immigrant students.  In a packed room, Metro State President Stephen Jordan and Metro board member Melody Harris responded to pointed questions from JBC chair Rep. Cheri Gerou and Rep. Kent Lambert, both Republicans.
http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20902508/metro-state-holds-ground-jbc-over-new-immigrant

Colorado’s tax revenue exceeded expectations –
Colorado finished the fiscal year with more tax revenue than economists anticipated, but analysts warned Wednesday that next year can produce slower growth.
Gov. John Hickenlooper's economists said the state will finish the year with about $7.6 billion in general fund revenue, about $239.5 million more than economists had projected in March. Analysts said taxes on stock sales have boosted the latest numbers.  "We are seeing job growth, but at the same time we're still trying to crawl back to the point we were before the recession," said Henry Sobanet, Hickenlooper's chief economist.   Economists said the figures show Colorado is faring better than the nation. However, Hickenlooper's office noted that general fund revenue is still about $1 billion lower than it was five years ago when adjusted for inflation.
http://www.denverpost.com/legislature/ci_20903861/colorado-tax-revenue-exceeded-expectations

Ed News:
Metro chief defends undocumented tuition –
A face-to-face meeting between Metro State College leaders and key legislators on the contentious issue of undocumented student tuition brought a promise from Metro to consider new developments and spotlighted the tricky legal question behind the issue.  Separate from the hearing, Wednesday brought Gov. John Hickenlooper’s first public statement on the issue, a carefully worded paragraph that tried to appeal to both sides in the undocumented tuition debate but leaned against Metro’s action.
http://www.ednewscolorado.org/2012/06/20/39345-metro-chief-defends-undocumented-tuition

Good but uncertain revenue news –
Legislative and executive branch economists on Wednesday had good news about state revenues but warned that prospects for the economy remain uncertain.  The June forecasts are a key starting point for the annual state budget cycle, and the new set of estimates give hopeful indications – but no guarantees – for K-12 and higher education funding in the 2013-14 budget year.  State budget director Henry Sobanet told reporters after a legislative briefing that if the current forecasts hold, “I think it’s safe to say education funding will increase” in 2013-14.
http://www.ednewscolorado.org/2012/06/20/39290-good-but-uncertain-revenue-news

Rocky Mountain Collegian:
LSU Professor: Chancellor Martin Comes to Colorado State after ‘pushing’ La. Governor Jindal for higher education reform –
According to observers at LSU, CSU’s new Chancellor Michael Martin isn’t afraid to fight for higher education, even when his opponent is the state’s governor.  Robert Mann, a mass communications professor at LSU, believes that Martin and those around him did their best to hold the university together despite flat faculty salaries for the past three years, a 10 percent loss in staff, $102 million in budget cuts and pressure from the Louisiana governor’s office.  Mann noted that throughout the budget cuts at LSU— which, after Martin’s resignation, is now without a Provost or Chancellor— Martin was a vocal opponent of Gov. Jindal’s position on higher education.  “They clearly were annoyed by the audacity to defend your own university against budget cuts, but [Martin] did,” Mann said. “He did, at least until the President of the system issued basically a gag order telling everybody to shut up and pretend to be grateful for the crumbs the Governor was willing to give us.”
http://www.collegian.com/2012/06/20/lsu-professor-colorado-states-new-chancellor-michael-martin-leaves-lsu-after-pushing-la-governor-jindal-for-higher-education-reform/

Ed Week:
(Blog) Researcher Calls for Better College-Readiness Counselor Training –
If counselors are to be key players in helping students get ready for college, a new paper by a Harvard researcher suggests they need to be better trained.
Professional College Knowledge: Re-envisioning How We Prepare Our College Readiness Workforce by Mandy Savitz-Romer, a faculty member and director of the Prevention Science and Practice Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, was released today by the National Association for College Admission Counseling, the Arlington, Va.-based organization of college-admissions professionals.  Professionals in the college-admissions and -access field include school counselors, professionals from community-based organizations, independent counselors, and college and university staff.
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/college_bound/2012/06/call_for_standardized_counselor_training_for_college_readiness.html

June 22, 2012

Inside Higher Ed:
Budget cuts will drive federal policy on for-profits, Gunderson says –
Federal budget woes will dominate the ongoing policy debate over for-profit colleges, said Steven Gunderson, president of the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities, the industry's primary trade group. And as a result, he said, for-profit institutions should reduce their reliance on revenue from federal financial aid.  “There’s not enough money,” said Gunderson, who was speaking here at the association's annual meeting. “We can’t survive on Title IV funding in an era of deficit reduction.”  Gunderson was part of a panel that tackled the question of whether partisan politics have driven the crackdown on for-profits. But the former congressman from Wisconsin predicted that money, or the lack thereof, would be more important than ideology in setting the Obama administration’s higher education policy agenda going forward.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/22/budget-cuts-will-drive-federal-policy-profits-gunderson-says

Wall Street Journal:
Do Too Many Young People Go to College? –
A college education was once regarded as a first-class ticket to a better life.   See the complete Big Issues in Education report on Monday, June 25.  But the rising costs of higher education, the burden of student loans and a less-certain job market have left many wondering: Are too many young people going to college?   We sat down with a group of education-policy experts—Sandy Baum, senior fellow at George Washington University's Graduate School of Education and Human Development; James O'Neill, co-founder of the Thiel Foundation's 20 Under 20 Thiel Fellowship; Richard Vedder, director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity; and Vivek Wadhwa, a fellow at Stanford University's Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance—to debate the question.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203960804577239253121093694.html?mod=WSJ_WSJ_Careers_PublicSearch

New York Times:
Mitch Daniels Elected Next Purdue President –
Gov. Mitch Daniels of Indiana was unanimously voted the next president of Purdue University by the board of trustees on Thursday, making official what had been reported by a number of local and national news outlets this week.  Mr. Daniels, a Republican who cannot run for a third term because of term limits, will start as the university’s 12th president in January.
http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/21/indiana-governor-to-be-president-of-purdue/?ref=education

Romney Exhibits a Change in Tone on Immigration –
Mitt Romney struck a more conciliatory tone toward illegal immigrants on Thursday than he took during the Republican primary season, but he backed only limited steps to address the concerns of many Hispanic voters as he confronted one of the trickiest issues in his efforts to build a broad general election coalition.  Speaking to a group of Hispanic officials in the heart of a swing state, Mr. Romney made his most extensive remarks on immigration since President Obama announced last week that he would use executive authority to allow many young people who are in the country illegally to avoid deportation. Mr. Romney reiterated his support for giving legal status to illegal immigrants who serve in the military, and said he would “staple a green card” to the diplomas of immigrants who receive advanced degrees.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/22/us/politics/romney-exhibits-a-change-in-tone-on-immigration.html?ref=politics

June 23-26, 2012

Denver Post:
CU budget set at $2.9 billion, includes caps on raises for administrators –
The University of Colorado system's budget is set at $2.9 billion for the fiscal year that begins next week, and it includes limits on salary increases for top-earning employees.  Approved by the Board of Regents last week, the budget is 2.5 percent more than last year's. Key revenue increases include an extra $20.8 million from nonresident tuition and an extra $39.3 million in health services fees. Meanwhile, state funding for the CU general fund and for financial aid has dropped.   CU's $2.9 billion budget includes the system administration and the university's four campuses.
http://www.denverpost.com/education/ci_20933236/cu-budget-set-at-2-9-million-includes

Los Angeles Times:
(Calif.) Budget deal seeks to freeze UC, CSU tuition –
California's public universities could lose out on an extra $125 million in state funds if they hike tuition in the fall under a budget agreement that legislative leaders have reached with Gov. Jerry Brown.  Lawmakers and the governor have no authority over tuition. The deal represents a bold attempt to use the state budget in their ongoing effort to force the University of California and California State University systems to keep the price of higher education in check. Details of the plan, which is expected to pass the Legislature in coming days, were released by the Assembly on Monday. The proposal includes significant caveats.  The money would be available next summer, but only if voters approve billions of dollars in tax increases in November; otherwise, there would be no cash infusion beyond the money already in the budget for the campuses. The proposal thus gives Brown and his fellow Democrats another selling point in their campaign for higher levies.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-state-budget-20120626,0,1925801.story

NY Times:
Public Universities See Familiar Fight at Virginia –
The tumult at the University of Virginia — with the sudden ouster of President Teresa Sullivan on June 10, and the widespread anticipation that she will be reinstated on Tuesday — reflects a low-grade panic now spreading through much of public higher education.  “Is it possible to be a successful president of a public university?” mused Mark G. Yudof, the president of the University of California. “I’m not willing to say these jobs are impossible, but these are very difficult times. You want to be more efficient, but you don’t want to make changes so fast that you endanger academic values and traditions and alienate the faculty. But you can’t go too slow, or you alienate the board and the legislature. It’s a volatile mix.” Across the nation, it has been a rocky year for public university presidents: Richard W. Lariviere, the president of the University of Oregon, was fired in November, despite strong faculty support, after pushing aggressively for more independence from the state. Amid similar strains — but voluntarily — Carolyn Martin left the University of Wisconsin to become president of the far smaller Amherst College. At the University of Illinois, a faculty mutiny helped spur President Michael Hogan’s resignation after less than two years on the job. And at the University of Texas this spring, there were rumblings that President Bill Powers was in danger after a clash with the board and the governor over his request for a tuition increase.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/26/education/public-universities-see-familiar-fight-at-virginia.html?_r=1&ref=education

(Op-Ed) Fixing College Though Lower Costs and Better Technology –
NO matter what the University of Virginia’s governing board decides today, when it is scheduled to determine the fate of the university’s ousted president, Teresa A. Sullivan, the intense interest in the case shows how much anxiety surrounds the future of higher education — especially the question of whether university leaders are moving too slowly to position their schools for a rapidly changing world (as some of Ms. Sullivan’s critics have suggested of her).  There is good reason for the anxiety. Setting aside the specifics of the Virginia drama, university leaders desperately need to transform how colleges do business. Higher education must make up for the mistakes it made in what I call the industry’s “lost decade,” from 1999 to 2009. Those years saw a surge in students pursuing higher education, driven partly by the colleges, which advertised heavily and created enticing new academic programs, services and fancy facilities.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/26/opinion/fixing-college-through-lower-costs-and-better-technology.html?ref=opinion

June 27-29, 2012

Denver Post:
Tom Tancredo’s foundation will sue Metro State over immigrant tuition (6/26/12) –
Former Congressman Tom Tancredo said his foundation is planning on filing a lawsuit in district court in an attempt to block Metropolitan State College's planned new tuition rate for illegal immigrant students.  Tancredo, the president of the Rocky Mountain Foundation, a non-profit organization, said the proposed tuition rate violates state law.  "The legal opinion issued last week by Attorney General John Suthers confirms what we all know, that the action of Metro State is unlawful," Tancredo said in a release. "Administrators and trustees at different state colleges can have honest disagreements about tuition policies but they must obey the law. Metro State must wait for the General Assembly to change the law, and if the law is not changed, they can't make new laws by themselves."

Guest Commentary: Metro State is on the right side of history and the law (6/26/12) –
As a state, we continue to struggle with the Colorado paradox: While we have historically maintained a very educated workforce, we have done so by importing talent from other states, continuing to neglect the development of talented students in our own state. This is why we must do everything we can to cultivate the talents of our best and brightest students, including our undocumented students, as they will be the next generation of highly skilled workers in Colorado who will help us bring new jobs and industries to the state.
http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_20935766/guest-commentary-metro-state-is-right-side-history?IADID=Search-www.denverpost.com-www.denverpost.com

Editorial: Relief on student loans – for now (6/28/12)
The truly odd thing about the student loan interest rate debate that has occupied Congress for months is that nearly everyone agrees allowing rates to double is unacceptable.  The conflict has been over how to pay for the legislation, a disagreement that seems to be at the crux of many of the disputes among federal lawmakers these days.  Nevertheless, the word is that they're getting close on a deal, and that would be a positive development for the 7.4 million needy students who depend on federally subsidized loans to pay for higher education.
http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_20954883/editorial-relief-student-loans-now

Inside Higher Ed:
College for All? –
The backlash to college tends to be cyclical. But this latest iteration, in which pundits and politicians have questioned a supposed crusade for “college for all,” has been bolstered by the double whammy of a prolonged recession and a presidential election.  Many in higher education say the argument merely knocks down a straw man, because neither President Obama nor the powerful foundations leading the “completion agenda” have said that everyone should go to college; instead, they argue that everyone needs some postsecondary training, and that those who do go on to college should graduate at higher rates.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/29/politicians-and-pundits-ramp-questions-about-value-degrees

Private Sector, Public Money –
For-profit colleges took a hit this week in California, another sign that policy battles over the commercial higher ed sector may be shifting to the states.  Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday signed the state's budget, which he said reflects “tough choices” to close a $16 billion shortfall. Among the budget cuts was a $134 million reduction in spending on the generous Cal Grant financial aid program, a cut that will mostly affect students at for-profit colleges.
To be eligible to receive Cal Grants, the budget plan requires colleges to have a six-year graduation rate of at least 30 percent and a maximum three-year cohort default rate on students loans of 15.5 percent. Community colleges were exempt from the new standards, which apply only to institutions where more than 40 percent of students take out federal loans. (California’s community colleges don’t charge enough in tuition for federal loans to be an issue.)
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/29/profits-take-brunt-new-cal-grant-cuts

Watch Out for Fake Colleges –
International students hoping to come to the United States to pursue a degree are being lured by “sham schools” in the U.S., said Janice Jacobs, assistant secretary for consular affairs at the U.S. Department of State, in a presentation Thursday.  Jacobs discussed student visa issues to begin the second day of the State Department's three-day EducationUSA Forum, which brought together national and international education advisers to discuss ways to promote the United States as a study destination.  Consular officers handed out 910,000 exchange and vocational study visas in 2011, and more than 81 percent of applicants in those categories received visas -- many of them within a few days, she said.  Jacobs assured administrators that officers don't reject visa applications if they don't recognize the name of the college to which the visa applicant has been accepted. She said applications are evaluated based on the applicant's reason for studying in the United States, what his or her goals are, and how he or she expects to achieve those goals.  But even though officers can't show bias against less-familiar American colleges, they are told to look out for fake ones.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/29/administrators-warned-about-sham-schools-target-international-students